CAMP 15 PHOTO PAGE

MEMORIAL DAY 2000 AT THE HARTRANFT MONUMENT
Camp 15 and Auxiliary 7 preformed a Memorial Day ceremony and laid a wreath at the Gen Hartranft Statue located on the State Capital grounds in Harrisburg. From right to left are Brother Dave Sosnowski, Commander Tim Schaible, and Brother Don Simmons.

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JOHN RUNKLE

Commander-in-Chief 1949-50
Past Department Commander 1938-39
Past Hartranft Camp Commander.
Organized Harrisburg Fife and Drum Corp in the 1930's

"Brother Runkle's devotion to his Country's interests and to the Order of Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War was always manifest. Nested to his name in our Book of Memories we shall inscribe the word 'Semper Fidelis' and though he has passed from our visible presence, his virtues and his helpfulness will be long in our memories; and the Spirit of John Runkle will remain with us always"
From the 116th Department of Pennsylvania Encampment booklet,

June 21-23,1996. Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

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Isaiah T. Enders was born on August 31, 1843 in Enders, PA. Before the war, he worked on his father's farm. He was the son of George Enders and Susan Fetterhoff who were parents of sixteen children.
Isaiah was mustered in at Harrisburg on July 4, 1863, in the 36th PA Infantry Regiment, Co. C. The 36th Regiment was sent to Gettysburg and its commanding officer, Col. H. C. Alleman was made Military Governor of the district. On August 11, 1863, Isaiah was discharged in Harrisburg, PA, with the rank of Private.

Isaiah later enlisted in the 92nd PA Regiment, Co. E, 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry on February 24, 1864 at Camp Cameron, near Harrisburg, PA. They saw action in Tennessee. and Georgia.  On the 14th of November the regiment started on its march with General Sherman to the sea. The 9th was then assigned to the First Brigade, Third Division of Cavalry under General Judson Kilpatrick. The last guns fired in Sherman's command were from the 9th Cavalry! The regiment marched from Morrisville to Durham to escort General Sherman to the Bennett house to meet with General Johnston. After the surrender, the command moved through Greenville to Lexington where it remained until it was mustered out of service. Isaiah was mustered out as a private with the company on July 18, 1865 and arrived back in Enders July 27th.

This biography is from "Captain Enders' Legion, The Civil War
Service of the Descendants of Philip Christian Enders," a book I
recently co-authored with my cousin Karl Schaffer of Massillon
Ohio. I mailed a copy on August 2, 2001
as a gift to Camp No. 15.

Isaiah Enders is Camp 15's Russ Ottens' Great-great uncle !

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John F. Hartranft
Photo source:  Library Congress
John F. Hartranft was born in Fagleysville, 6 miles from Pottstown, Montgomery County, PA, on 16 Dec 1830. He attended school in Virginia and received his degree from Union College in New York He practiced law and spent some time in politics. He served at the Colonel of the 4th Pennsylvania, a 90-day volunteer unit that turned its back and went home on the eve of First Manassas when their enlistment was up. Hartranft was humiliated by the decision and he stayed to fight with the army. This act earned him the Medal of Honor. He was appointed Colonel, 51st Pennsylvania, on 16 Nov 1861 and led a successful attack against Burnside Bridge at Antietam. He was a brigade and division commander in the IX Corps, Department of the Potomac and commanded in the IX Corps, Department of the Ohio. He served various commands of brigade and division levels. He was brevetted Major General, USV, 25 Mar 1865. At war's end he was appointed a special provost marshal during the trial of those accused in Lincoln's assassination. He was mustered out of service in 1866. He was elected Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic in 1875 and again 1876. He was a charter member of Post No. 11, Norristown, Pennsylvania. He was elected Governor of Pennsylvania on the Republican ticket and served from 1872-78, as well as general auditor, the postmaster of Philadelphia, and collector of the city port.  He was the commander of the Pennsylvania National Guard. (1879 - 1889) He died on 17 Oct 1898, Philadelphia, PA.

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REAL SON MARTIN LANDIS TAKES OATH.

The Reverend Martin Landis, of Colonial Park, is a son of a Civil War veteran.  In 1863, his father, A. Martin Landis, Sr., was allowed, at age 15, to join the Union effort at Camp Curtin, Harrisburg,  He was mustered into the 187th Regiment, Pennsylvania Voluntary Infantry.   In 1865, he was assigned as a guard overseeing the body of Abraham Lincoln.  In 1906, when he reached the age of 59, this Civil War veteran's young wife gave birth to young Martin.  

This year I will celebrate my ninety-second birthday. I am possibly the youngest living direct son (NOT grandson) of a Civil War veteran. I married in 1928 and the same year a daughter was born to me and my wife, Joyce Eileen Landis - there being 80 years between the birth of my daughter and that of my father. I married a second time in 1952 and on October 3, 1954, my second wife presented me with a son, Gregory Paul Landis - there being 106 years between the birth of my father and my son's birth. 1848 to 1954.
My son and I rode in a Jeep on July 3rd, 1963, during the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, with him being the youngest direct living grandson of a Civil War soldier. My son was then nine years of age.
I am a retired pastor of the Church of God denomination. But at ninety-two I am still conducting services at homes for the aged and filling in as interim pastor at churches temporarily without a pastor.

Martin Landis - January 1999
The only known living son of a Civil War veteran, in Central Pennsylvania.

More on Martin Landis

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Hartranft Camp #15 along with Department of Pa. Commander Glenn Knight and re-enactor color guard participate in 1998 Memorial Day ceremony at the restored Midland Cemetery. Burial site of many USCT soldiers and freed slaves.

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MEMORIAL DAY 2000
Members of Hartranft Camp #15 and Ladies Auxiliary #7 and #27 at the 2000 Memorial Day Ceremony.(L-R) Carolyn Billups-Auxiliary #27, Dave Sosnowski, Tim Schaible-Camp #15, Mary Smith, Mary Jane Bannan, Elizabeth Sienerth-Auxiliary #7, Don Simmons-Camp #15

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TESTIMONIAL FOR 2003 PA COMMANDER AL KERN

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Camp members pose for a picture after putting flags on the graves of veterans for Memorial Day.

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Chaplain Demmy congratulates Landis
Born for Service to His Country

by Pastor A. Martin Landis

At 1:48 a.m., Sunday, January 19, 1848, on a farm outside of Newville, Cumberland County, a baby son was born to Aaron Martin and Sarah Landis. When the son reached sixteen years of age, he talked his father into taking him in the old one-horse shay to Camp Curtin in Harrisburg, where he enlisted in the Union Army. He saw service in three battles, the last one being Cold Harbor.

After this battle, he was visited at his tent by three escaped slaves who ran away from their master in Richmond, Virginia. The slaves asked the young soldier if he could escort them to the first point of what was known as the "Underground Railroad" (an escape route into Pennsylvania). The young sixteen year old (Aaron Martin Landis by name) asked permission of his Captain to carry out the slaves' request. It was granted and he led them to the first point of the escape way. The year was 1864.

One year later, Aaron Martin was selected as one of the eight guards to stand around the body of the slain President Lincoln as his body lay in state in Independence Hall, Philadelphia. This was a singular honor for my father. He married, joined the police force, and became chief of police in 1885. That year his wife died.  He resigned the force and ran for alderman of the sixth ward of the city. He was elected to his first six year term and was reelected six more times for a total of 36 years    a record for continuous service as an alderman surpassing any other alderman's record in the city of Harrisburg.

Years later, my father had the fortune to re-meet one of those ex-slaves in a store in downtown Harrisburg.

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